Stop 2010 World Cup Animal Sacrifice More than Just Another Petition

Note: For those who have not been following the story, please see: https://thewordwright.wordpress.com/2009/10/25/2010-soccer-world-cup-animal-sacrifice-planned/

A week ago, I felt as though mine would be the only voice screaming to FIFA and the South African 2010 Soccer World Cup Local Organising Committee to disallow the animal sacrifices planned by the so-called traditional leaders here in honour of the event. Minutes within launching the petition (http://www.thepetitionsite.com/1/Stop-2010-World-Cup-Animal-Sacrifice) on the Care2 network though, it became apparent that I was wrong – other voices were joining mine from right across the world.

The chorus grew rapidly and is but a few voices short of the 2,000 signatory milestone.  Judging by the overwhelming public response, 10,000 signatures are within reach! A month and a day remains before the self-imposed deadline for submitting the Stop South Africa from Sacrificing Animals at 2010 Soccer World Cup petition to the FIFA Executive Committee.

Driving towards success in the mean time ….

To improve our chances for success in stopping South Africa from sacrificing animals for the 2010 Soccer World Cup, we have to manage our drive as a carefully orchestrated CAMPAIGN. Unless we do that, we will probably be brushed off and ignored.

We figured that a really good target would be each and every one of the 2010 World Cup Sponsors and Partners – both locally and abroad.

The 2010 World Cup Sponsors are:

  • Budweiser
  • Continental
  • MTN
  • McDonalds
  • Satyam
  • Castrol

The FIFA Partners are:

  • Adidas
  • Coca Cola
  • Sony
  • Hyandai
  • Visa
  • Emirates

The FIFA South Africa Partners are:

  • BP
  • Neoafrica
  • Telkom
  • FNB
  • Prasa

Next week I will be sending an email to the Board of each of these sponsors and partners. In brief the email will contain:

  • a link to the Reuters article which broke the news of the impending sacrifices -http://uk.reuters.com/article/idUKLN24914120091023, and
  • a link to the Stop 2010 World Cup Animal Sacrifice petition on the Care2 network

We will also be asking them, as sponsors / partners of FIFA and the 2010 Soccer World Cup, whether they agree with the proposed sacrifices of animals to honour the event. Naturally I will remind them that should the sacrifices happen, they will by virtue of their presence at the 2010 World Cup, be viewed as in support of this abhorrent practice.

Their responses will be duly noted both here and on the Care2 Network Site.

Once the petition is submitted …

Do we sit an wait for a response, hoping that someone somewhere in the great rambling FIFA organisation will send us some sort of an acknowledgement or perhaps even go to the trouble of discussing the matter with their South African ‘leg’?

This kind of tack would be downright naive.

The high level plan of action is thus, that over and above submitting the most crucial document in the campaign (namely the petition) to the FIFA Executive Committee, we will be sending copies of this petition to the FIFA CEO, the Chairman of the South African 2010 World Cup Local Organising Committee, and the 2010 World Cup Sponsors and Partners.

To ensure that we prevent the ‘out of sight out of mind’ trap, we will be asking supporters of the petition (those that are prepared to remain involved for a while longer) to send a pre-formulated email message to all the above organisations on a daily basis. Email addresses will be supplied.

Right now…

Securing as many signatures as possible is of paramount importance. If you have not done so yet, please sign and ask others to do the same. The petition is located at http://www.thepetitionsite.com/1/Stop-2010-World-Cup-Animal-Sacrifice.

Thank you 🙂

Campaign Progress: Stop South Africa’s planned 2010 Soccer World Cup Animal Sacrifice

“The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.” —Ghandi


If you have not been following the story, and stumbled across this blog entry, please have a look at:

https://thewordwright.wordpress.com/2009/10/25/2010-soccer-world-cup-animal-sacrifice-planned/

The campaign to stop South Africa from proceeding with the sacrifice of animals in ‘blessing’ the 2010 Soccer World Cup is doing well!

Update on Stop South Africa from sacrificing animals at 2010 Soccer World Cup Petition

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/1/Stop-2010-World-Cup-Animal-Sacrifice

The initial dripping support has grown into a steady trickle and the petition now sports, at the time of this writing, 655 signatures. Considering that the petition was only started at 9pm (GMT+2) on October 23rd, this is a very encouraging result! Thank you to all who have been of help.

FIFA Executive Committee

I contacted FIFA directly, provided the information as reported upon by Reuters and informed them that a petition is running in opposition to the application filed by traditional leaders in South Africa. I went on to tell them that I am not of the belief that any one of the committee members could possibly be in favour of sullying the image of the 2010 World Cup by allowing the blood of animals to be spillt in this way. I asked them for their support against the application and am awaiting their feedback.

Animal Rights Organisations

To ensure that organised support is lent to the “Stop South Africa from sacrificing animals at 2010 Soccer World Cup” campaign, I contacted PETA and Animal Rights Africa on Sunday night. Thus far I have not received any response from either. Naturally I will be approaching many more over the next few days.

Blogs

Many concerned blog owners have included a link to the petition in their blogs. Naturally the response from blog commenters were varied, some airing their concern, others airing their disbelief and others still their opinion that we are all a bunch of animal rights wackos. So be it. If you stick your hand up, the odd bite at it is to be expected.

Media

Thus far, I have only been commenting on articles covering the proposed sacrifice of animals in blessing of the 2010 Soccer World Cup. As soon as the petition reaches 1,000 signatories, I will be contacting newspapers and news channels directly. Hopefully this will catapult the campaign to higher levels.

What you can do to help the cause?

No activism is necessary. Simply send the petition link and, if you wish, a link to the original blog entry, to people you know. Here are the links again:

Blog entry

https://thewordwright.wordpress.com/2009/10/25/2010-soccer-world-cup-animal-sacrifice-planned/

Petition

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/1/Stop-2010-World-Cup-Animal-Sacrifice

Who will the ‘Stop South Africa from sacrificing animals at 2010 Soccer World Cup’ petition be submitted to?

It was not an easy decision, but I eventually decided that the FIFA Executive Committee and the South African FIFA 2010 Soccer World Cup Organising Committee are the most appropriate recipients. To ensure that both these bodies can act in a timely manner, the targeted date for submission is the end of November 2009.

Once again: A heartfelt thanks for your wonderful support 🙂

2010 Soccer World Cup Animal Slaughter – Just The Tip Of The Iceberg

Happy slaughter ritual participants

After writing the blog (https://thewordwright.wordpress.com/2009/10/25/2010-soccer-world-cup-animal-sacrifice-planned/) yesterday on the planned ritual slaying of cows by South Africa in lieu of the 2010 Soccer World Cup, a few things kept lingering in my mind. So, I decided to put them in writing today:

One: The bloodthirsty throat slitting – or rather throat hacking – of sacrificial cows are not the worst ceremonies these animals are subjected to in this country. There are some rituals where a bull would be killed with bare hands (obviously the poor animal would be tied down). This involves gouging out his eyes, tongue, testicles and tearing his throat open. As you can imagine the latter takes a while to achieve. Cattle hide is rather tough. And YES. These heinous acts are all perpetrated to celebrate spirituality! ???????

Two: The SPCA is suddenly being referred to as if they could be the potential saviours of cows while, in real every day South African life, they – in a s far as I know – NEVER get involved with any of the so-called ‘cultural’ animal killings. On the one hand, it simply would not be politically correct. (And I am saying the latter with a good measure of sarcasm.) On the other hand, and in all fairness, it could also be very dangerous for the inspectors to try this. Chances are good that the gathering could turn on them – and this could end up in grievous bodily harm or even death. Africa is not for the fainthearted. (No, I am not exaggerating – read the SA newspapers)

Three: The number of  cows earmarked for death by suffering to celebrate the 2010 Soccer World Cup is, compared to the number of cow (and bull and goat and chicken) sacrifices in South Africa,  like a single cup of water out of a great big seething cesspool of a dam.  When you take all of Africa into account, the dam becomes a polluted ocean.

The petition (http://www.thepetitionsite.com/1/Stop-2010-World-Cup-Animal-Sacrifice) I launched on Saturday night (GMT+2) in an attempt to stop the ritual killing of cows at each of the ten stadiums to be used for the 2010 FIFA Soccer World Cup is standing at 195 signatories at the time of this writing. We are still 49,805 signatures away from our target.

The petition will be submitted to the FIFA Executive committee and the South African 2010 FIFA World Cup Local Organising Committee.  I believe that if we have enough support, if the media gives the matter sufficient attention and if animal rights organisations internationally endorse the campaign against the planned 2010 World Cup Animal Sacrifice Rituals, it can be stopped.

For now it is work in progress.

The South African Property Situation Right Now

Absa just released their Mortgage Advances (http://www.finforum.co.za/absa/publications/property/Mortgage%20advances.pdf) – and Housing Review Q1 08 Reports (http://www.finforum.co.za/absa/publications/property/Property%20perspective.pdf). When I read it this morning, I had a few thoughts on the topic of property.Everybody seems to be complaining bitterly: Homeowners about the expected 0.1% year on year real price growth on average housing in 2008 and the banks about the prevailing mortgage advance growth of 23.1%. But if you take a journey back in time, you cannot help but wonder whether this is not a matter of complaining with a white bread tucked away under the arm.

The truth of the matter is that house pricing, after growing at less than 0% – yep, negative growth – towards the end of 1999, went through an unprecedented growth period until last year with the average house increasing in real value terms by between 15% and 17% year on year. A further truth is that the banks have forgotten that once upon a time, in 2000, they showed a 4% year on year growth in mortgage advances. Now, a bad case scenario projection for 2008 is just short of an average of 16% year on year, and that is the NCA, the 9.4% CPIX inflation and the volatile Rand in spite.

Perhaps we need to remind ourselves from time to time that playing the property game is not about turning a quick buck. The recent boom created this very expectation because many property dabblers made a decent stash within a very short period of time. This is the exception, not the rule. Property is and will always be a really good medium to long term investment – for those that have the patience to wait. For those that don’t consider patience as one of their virtues, the stock market is a higher risk, but quicker return option.

One of the great things about the property game is that even when the market is depressed, you will have the opportunity to make worthy investments. You just have to select a different battle field and employ a different strategy. For example, right now you would do well with a couple of buy to let properties in the right areas and at the right price. You could also engage with the Zimbabwe situation and, if the MPC really manages to oust the despotic Mugabe regime, you may even want to stake a claim to a piece of land there as a potentially lucrative medium term investment.

For those that prefer the security of a South African venture, the outlook is not as bleak as the prophets of doom make it out to be: The Rand has already started firming up, which should support our wobbly inflation rate. Oil is back down to below $100. If it can remain there, food inflation should improve, which should also contribute to taking some of the wobble out of our CPIX. If this happens, the interest rates will have to come down. I am not promising a drastic reduction, but who will say no to paying 0.5% to 1% less on their bond? I, for one, will be only too happy.

Finally, there is a marketplace in the desert called the Soccer World Cup 2010. I for one am in two minds whether this place is a mirage or an oasis. Those in the know seem to believe it is the real McCoy, and are buying and furnishing multiple properties in the CBDs.

Whether this is wisdom or folly, only time will tell. What really matters is getting a bit more upbeat about certain things: the wheel turns and, after a lengthy 3-and-a-half-year downturn, perhaps the property wheel is about to start its upturn again.